The Crimson Petal and the White, by Michel Faber

What can I say about this book? It was a journey, an adventure, an endeavor. I loved every page of it and was left aching, (I swear I felt a physical ache) for more at the end. Every time I read one of Faber's novels, I say his characters are what make it. And this is …

Reading vs performing

Jeremy Irons' reading of Lolita is really good. I wish more audiobooks would have actors as the narrator, because he is doing way more than just reading the text. It's a performance. Tone is so important, timing, enunciation--all these things can change the meaning of something so drastically.  I would be very picky about how …

Obsession

Since the current thing I'm working on has a lot to do with obsession, I was recommended to read Lolita, by Vladimir Nabokov. I got the audible version and so far am impressed by both the writing and the reading of it (narration by Jeremy Irons). It's always been interesting to me how people justify their …

The end of words

What, if anything, would replace the written word? Perhaps telepathy--some form of direct mental communication. Or possibly, in a world where society has collapsed, it would be replaced with nothing. Maybe words will be upgraded to include more information. Maybe words could be invented that described such unique events and feelings that you could put …

To contract or not contract

What makes a writer decide not to use contractions? Especially in a story written in first person, they seem like a natural choice to make it sound more like a person speaking. In Borne, the narrator doesn't contract. Saying 'could not' and 'can not' and 'did not' etc, isn't exactly distracting, but I notice it …