Vertigo, by W.G. Sebald: A dark view on memory

This book is about memory. But similar to the other Sebald novel I've read, Rings of Saturn, the true meaning of the book was not clear to me until the end. The novel features an unnamed narrator who may or may not be Sebald himself, traveling about Europe and reminiscing (also similar to Rings of …

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Proust: Rambling thoughts, or more?

I've started listening to my first Proust, and it's not very engaging. It is interesting though. Mainly I'm thinking "this guy is just going on about inane memories that can have no importance to anyone other than himself, and yet this is a classic." I think that goes to show that you really can write …

Alternate Worlds: in which reality is opinion

In this world, augmented reality technology is so advanced, that 'real' is up for debate. Anything you see can be altered to look like anything you want. Anything you feel can be altered to feel however you chose. Any video can be faked, any words anyone says can be altered. The majority  chooses reality, or …

Flying far away

I'm getting on a plane to Singapore this evening, to fly across the sea to see my lady's family. And have some fun exploring too! It will be the third time I've done so, and I think I'm getting pretty good at traveling. Bringing less, and having less stress each time. I hope to keep …

Solaris, by Stanislaw Lem

The end of this novel went in a different direction than I expected. I was drawn into it right away and was excited by the story and the ideas and the potential, but it feels like in the end it left much unexplored. There was a lot of attention focused on the technical details, research, …

Alternate worlds: in which I am a robot who forgot he is a robot

All memories of eating, bleeding, or other non robotic bodily functions have been inserted throughout the day by the memory chip in my positronic brain. Many times throughout the day, I shut down momentarily, freeze in place, and a recollection of drinking coffee or using the toilet is inscribed on my mind. Why? because, we …

Your darkest secret

I've been listening to Solaris, by Stanislaw Lem, and it is so far amazing. Imagine your darkest, most embarrassing, strangest thought. The thing you are most ashamed or guilty for thinking--maybe it just popped into your head, unplanned, as thoughts often do. Now imagine that thought made flesh, and following you around for all to …