Red magic?

 

I’m using Lucent Dreaming‘s writing prompt, because I ran out of ideas today!

What is Red Magic? Red is associated with love, and anger… both closely related. Passionate feelings are given the color red. I wonder why that is? It could be because blood is red, and this primal fact, deep in our brains, causes the association of red with painful, or powerful feelings of life and death.

Fire is also red… and is given the same characteristics of love and anger… consuming, unstoppable, destructive, hot…

What would red magic be? Probably something that flung you into blind, passionate love, set your mind ablaze with a broiling rage, and set you on fire in actual flames, all at once.

Love in the Time of Cholera

This was the story of love between many people over a lifetime.

There were so many little nuggets of goodness in this novel that it’s hard to give a general idea of why I liked it. I loved the description of Florintino, and found a lot of myself in him. He was also laughable at times, though, with his ridiculous ideas of love and his determination that bordered on obsession.

I enjoyed the juxtaposition of youth and age, and how their views on love differed, but the views that others took of them remained the same–they were kept apart in their youth because they were too young, but in their old age, their families try to keep them apart because they are too old for love!

Fermina has a hard/hot headedness that Florintino refuses to give in to, and it is fun and emotional to read. He is a tireless, endless lover and you can’t help but cheer for him to keep trying.

The kind of love that lets you fall for someone in your youth, and then be unable to forget about them for fifty years, even when they never talk to you or even acknowledge your existence, is difficult to imagine. But Marquez does a great job of giving me an insight, and a hint at what that might feel like.

 

All kinds of love

I’ve started listening to this novel, and so far–as the title would imply–it is all about love. The book opens with one character, and we follow from him, to his wife, to his wife’s past lover, and I assume we’ll keep bouncing around like this, in a sort of meandering way through the past. It’s very enjoyable so far.

Currently we’re following Fermina and Florintino, young lovers who communicate with letters only, having only said a few words in person, even though they live in the same town . Florintino stares at Fermina for months before talking to her. It’s a love that is as restrained as it is explosive.  And she feels it for him, too, and is tormented while waiting and waiting for him to say something to her.

It’s a perfect portrait of young love, and I’m curious how their relationship will evolve over the years, since we know from the opening of the novel that Florintino professes his love again to Fermina 50 years later, days after the death of her husband.

Engaging story so far!