Pale Fire, by Vladimir Nabokov

This is the epitome of genius. Nabokov must have some kind of freak literary gene that makes him so good with words. This is one of the few books I've wanted to start reading again the moment I reached the end. (I think Lolita was another...) On the surface, Pale fire is a 999 line …

Lolita, by Vladimir Nabokov

I am left wondering, about how the world perceives this book. This was not an erotic or romantic read. I can't think of any point a that I would describe as even slightly arousing. It is the story of a child rapist, who abducts and repeatedly assaults a child over the course of nearly three years. …

Predator in pathetic guise

I'm a bit more than halfway through Lolita, and am beginning to feel disturbed and disgusted. A slow, sickening feeling has been building for a while, and finally made me realize that Humbert is not a pathetic loser, but a cold predator. He is telling his story with the object of gaining sympathy. To do this …

The Crimson Petal and the White, by Michel Faber

What can I say about this book? It was a journey, an adventure, an endeavor. I loved every page of it and was left aching, (I swear I felt a physical ache) for more at the end. Every time I read one of Faber's novels, I say his characters are what make it. And this is …

Reading vs performing

Jeremy Irons' reading of Lolita is really good. I wish more audiobooks would have actors as the narrator, because he is doing way more than just reading the text. It's a performance. Tone is so important, timing, enunciation--all these things can change the meaning of something so drastically.  I would be very picky about how …