Strange Hotel, by Eimear McBride

I don't know if I have ever identified so strongly with a character with who I share so little lived experiences. This was a powerful, sad, startling, sometimes funny, most times existentially upsetting, and overall extremely readable book. The story follows a woman through several brief moments during different periods in her life, each moment …

The Melancholy of Resistance, by László Krasznahorkai

The second book I've read by this author (the other being Satantango) and written in a similar style. The rarely ending wall of text sucks you in to the overwhelming story and crushes you into nothingness by the end. The story describes a small town in Hungary that is visited by a circus, and the …

Agatha Christie books

I have watched hundreds of hours of mystery TV shows. I've seen every episode of the original 7 seasons of Columbo at least 4 times. Every episode of Murder She Wrote at least twice, every Episode of Poirot, Marple, Rosemary & Thyme, Father Brown, Sherlock Holmes, Hetty Wainthrop, Death in Paradise, most of Midsummer Murders, …

The Third Reich of Dreams, by Charlotte Beradt

I discovered this book via an article in the New Yorker, and knew I had to read it. I quickly discovered it was out of print (1000$ for a tattered paperback on Amazon) but I was luckily able to find a PDF online. That was Wednesday night (today is Friday). Needless to say, I couldn't …

Frost, by Thomas Bernhard

The opening paragraph of this novel is one of the best I've read, and is so humorous and sets the tone so well that I had to read the book. The narrator, a young medical intern, is given an unusual assignment to stay with, and observe his superior's brother, a reclusive painter named Strauch, and …