The Melancholy of Resistance, by László Krasznahorkai

The second book I've read by this author (the other being Satantango) and written in a similar style. The rarely ending wall of text sucks you in to the overwhelming story and crushes you into nothingness by the end. The story describes a small town in Hungary that is visited by a circus, and the …

2020 books catch up

I've read a bunch of books this year that I haven't written about. I have fallen far behind on the blogging train, so I'll try to catch up. Though it's been weeks or months in most cases, I'll try to remember my thoughts on each of the books I've read this year that I haven't …

Spring Snow by Yukio Mishima

I couldn't go one chapter in this book without at some point putting the book down to think about how beautiful it was. There are so many perfectly captured moments of beauty, describing both nature and humanity alike, that it's difficult to express how impressive reading this was to me. The only compare for beautiful …

The Loser, by Thomas Bernhard

The rambling, obsessive, internal thoughts of a bitter loser... who'd have thought they'd make such good reading? The Loser is about three piano virtuosos who meet in their early 20s at a music school. All three have great talent, but one of them is Glenn Gould (a real piano virtuoso--this story mixes some fact in …

On the Natural History of Destruction, by W.G. Sebald

In World War Two, 131 German cities and towns were bombed by the Allies, and many were entirely destroyed, leaving over seven million homeless, and 600,000 dead--twice the number of all American casualties in the war. The subject of this book is to ask, given the sheer scope of this destruction, why did rarely any …